CPAP and Sleep Apnea Education Center

Denture Removal and Sleep Apnea

OSA or Obstructive Sleep Apnea brings additional health risks than can be life-threatening if not treated. Stroke, heart failure, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic fatigue and other factors are only a few of the possible illnesses associated with sleep apnea. Most people who wear dentures at night usually take them out in order to prevent issues associated with excessive denture wear. Doctors frequently recommend removal of dentures before sleep because it is often associated with “chronic inflammatory changes leading to irritation, periodontitis, and alveolar bone resorption in the denture-supporting area,” according to researcher, H. Arisak.

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From Infants to Seniors: Changing Sleep Patterns as we Age

The human body goes through many changes as we age, and sleep patterns are a part of the normal aging process.  Sleep scientists refer to this change as “sleep architecture.”  One noticeable change is the decrease in the amount of sleep we get, from the 16-20 hours needed for an infant, to the 9 hours required for adolescents, to the 8 hours needed for adults, including seniors.  But research shows that it is a common misconception that seniors require less sleep.  The fact is that seniors often simply have a harder time getting to and staying asleep, and this is for a myriad of reasons.

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Sleep Apnea Diagnosis with the Watch-PAT 200

In the last several years, both treatments and diagnosis for sleep apnea have developed to increase patient comfort and convenience.  The process to determine if a patient has sleep apnea starts with testing.  In the past, it was necessary to test in a hospital environment at a sleep lab.  In this sleep lab, the patient has monitors and sensors applied at specific points on the body while a group of technicians and doctors watch how they sleep.  This can be a little unnerving for some and is the reason why in-home testing has been developed.

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Are You a Mouth Breather? These Masks May Help

When discussing CPAP treatments, “mouth breathers” refers to specially designed masks for those people who breathe through their mouth when they sleep.  Though it is preferred by most to breathe through the nose when sleeping, some have no choice but to breathe through the mouth because of chronic congestion, allergies, or narrowed nasal passages, and this may be the only way to get the proper amount of oxygen.

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Back To Basics: What is sleep apnea again?

Since the invention of the CPAP machine in the 1980’s, there has been so much improvement in technology for the treatment of sleep apnea, but the condition itself can so easily be over-looked when there is so much excitement.  After all the discussion on what’s new in CPAP machines and therapy, it seems appropriate to go back to the beginning and discuss why all the innovation.  What is sleep apnea again?

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What is the Sleep Doctor Looking for When Reading My At-Home Sleep Test?

After an in-home sleep study has been completed, and returned to Aeroflow Healthcare, it is then interpreted by the board-certified sleep physicians working with us. If the patient is not familiar with what the sleep doctor is looking for, they may feel slightly vulnerable. It can be unnerving to feel poorly and not know what is going on to cause it. In order to put nervous patients a little more at ease, here are the indicators our sleep doctors are looking for when reading the results of an in home sleep study.

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